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. and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater who proved his famous time for choosing television address which made him a political star overnight and led to his running for governor of california and eventually president of these united states. david recounts how bill rusher shore up the goldwater committee when money ran short and spirits sagged. skillfully guided young americans for freedom in his early chaotic days and forced some order and discipline on the blind spirits who ran the "national review," expanded the conservative movement through the tv program the advocates, his newspaper column and lectures and champion ronald reagan when other conservatives were somewhat skeptical about the actor turned politician. bill loved american politics, traveling to distant land, and national review's effervescent edit her bill buckley of whom he once said, quote, the most exasperating people in the world are so often the most beloved and he is no exception. david frisk has captured this and more in his sple
, particularly by congress. >> ronald reagan tried to do that. he came into office, and it was all is amazing to me, reagan has become one of our most beloved presidents. people forget some of the stuff that happened. and he wanted to change the direction of civil-rights. he wanted to make sure that the civil rights laws that were passed or not enforce the way they were supposed to be enforced. he decided that he would -- the first thing, the commission was standing up and what stocking administrations. so they said okay. we will chase the members. that we get into a big fight because when they got to me and get ready to change, i sued them and i sued them. i won the lawsuit that the course of the commission was supposed to be a watchdog. i used to say, what start in a lap dog. so that in changing the election of the commission, and even though later we were able to get some traction push the door, growing out of the 2000 election, the voters election, the commission has never been the same since that time. so reagan in the sense succeeded in making in the body that could not listen to ordina
of two compromises and begins with ronald reagan presidency, where tax reform was a hugely important issue and hugely difficult issue to get done between republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era's recognize that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch liberal democrat. ronald reagan's staunch republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise with bradley dan rostenkowski bob packwood being part of the movers of this compromise. password to the affordable care act. it is arguably even more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party because of the permanent campaign and how not just polarized, but resistance to compromise the two parties were. so the comparison between the tax reform act and the affordable care act helps us see how much more difficult compromise now is an how much more important it is for two parties to get together to craft a compromise on immigration, tax reform, and many other issues that the country now needs. >> host: is there a golden age of compromise? to real crises, 9/11
george washington, james madison, andrew jackson, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan and bill clinton. lincoln as its successful -- special case and that his second term was so brief. the it is interesting to note that only the president who had a more successful second term than their first was james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the presidents elected to a second term, and the reasons for those that have experienced failed or troubled second terms. for failed because of a war that seemed unwinnable, or for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the four. also, for failed because of economic crisis for failure to act to deter such a crisis. these were jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt from the 37 downturn, and george bush. at failed due to their inability to lead congress were jefferson, monroe, grants, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. to failed due to hubris, franklin roosevelt, and richard nixon are the four who did not effectively communicate their agendas or initiatives were jefferso
washington, james madison, andrew jackson, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan and bill clinton. the game is a special case in his successful second term was so brief. it's interesting to note that only presidents who had a more successful second term than their first were james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president-elect did to a second term and the reasons for those failed for a troubled second term. for failed because of a water seems on unwinnable. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the foyer. also for a failed because of the economic crisis for failure to act and deter such a crises. these are jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt's and george bush. it failed due to their inability to lead congress for jefferson, monroe, grant, well some, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. for he did not affect the philly communicate their agendas or initiatives for jefferson, monroe, grant in cleveland. obviously failure for second term president has been their inability to successfully wor
especially discouraging education was the fight against ronald reagan's decision in 1983 to station a medium-range missiles in europe to counter the soviet buildup of similar missiles on his side of the dividing line between its domain and the west. massive protests were planned here at home and all over the world, with the biggest one scheduled for the hague, to which over 1 million people from every country in western europe were streaming pipeline, by bus, and on foot. the dutch broadcasters have erected a glass booth overlooking the square to which the protesters were all marching, and they invited and ends from various european countries to sit there and comment on this great event. evidently, however, they were unable to find anyone in the whole of europe willing or able to support reagan's decision, which ish i repeat a panicky call at the last minute inviting me to participate, so desperate were they to spice up their discussion with anna from his action fascist, although i often played in those days, that he even offered to fly me over on the monstrously expensive concord. and so it
't mention the president that we popularly think are the most eloquent; ronald reagan and john f. kennedy. were they just good at regular words, or did they -- >> oh, no, they had, i mean, john f. kennedy had wonderful phrases, and the new frontier was his. but they were more or eloquent in sense of their ability to give speeches. ronald reagan as well. but they didn't have the -- it wasn't that they created a term that was, that just was with everlasting. i mean, some of them have interesting, you know, you go to new frontier, you go to truman, truman had some nice things. i mean, snollgoster, it was an old american term. truman had, um, i know that wasn't your question, but they've all got stories. my favorite trumanism was at one point he was having a lot of trouble with congress, and he invoked the term "trocar." trocar is a metal trumpet that's used to relieve pressure in organic places. and in the prairies in missouri when a bull or a cow or bovine animal would eat too much clover, there would be a huge amount of gas inside the, inside the animal, and they would insert this instrume
, was not elected. so he doesn't count. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. the first george bush from texas via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 in some ways watershed election. ends the 40-year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative cast to them. tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and southwest, that we see the rise of what -- by the 1970s we'll be talk about as the religious right. the rise of evangelical involvement in the process. so national defense, he was a staunch anticommunist and played an important role in right wing anticommunist politics in the late 1960s, one of the things that led him to switch parties in 1964. he was a key figure in opposing labor unions and did so long people like barry gold water. early in his caree
that teflon president ronald reagan. i have the words that come after them, hoover bill and have her eyes. president herbert hoover was in charge of the feeding of europe and the foodstuffs for the world. the hoover eyes need to be careful, not wasted, not throw food away. that's a positive turn back. , but yeah i do that because that's part of their legacy. >> are the reasons it nicely harder for president obama to notably nila chase analyst for the founding father? can he talk about how you research the book? >> it's probably a little bit harder, but if you just look at the language created by the internet and in the last 20 years, it probably isn't. it may happen by chance. when lincoln creates a really interesting words, one of the words he first uses he's talking about secession. he said the secessionist sugarcoating the impact on this country. the printer of the united states comes to lincoln and says we cannot put this in the official record. lincoln said i can't imagine any american not knowing. again, going back to william safire's influence on his, one of the first uses of cool,
's going to be similar to the past inaugurations. last time as president ronald reagan's second inaugural. ceremonies will be inside the rotunda and that is a decision that the joint committee in consultation with the presidential inaugural committee would meet on sunday after and so that everyone has the time to adjust and make plans. >> the only thing i would add to that is our goal is to have this event go forward. that being said, we are not going to put anyone in harm's way. so the real driver on the decision making process will be public safety. as you all know that were here four years ago kohl doesn't seem to slow us down so we will deal with that as it comes up. we are saying each element of this outside of the swearing and are the traditions important to the president and the first family and the country to really show what our transition of democracy is all about, so again our hope is to be able to move forward with as many as possible regardless of what the weather is. >> yes, in the middle. >> y hushovd reversal from four years ago as far as more transparency on the reversal
:00 p.m. eastern with president ronald reagan's address from 1981. bill clinton from 1993, president eisenhower in 1957, at 9:00 p.m. harry truman from 1949. richard nixon from 1969, and president john f kennedy in 1961. george h. w. bush in 1989. lyndon johnson in 1965. from 1977 jimmy carter and wrap up with george w. bush's speech from 2001. see ten inauguration speeches from ten past presidents. starting at 8:00 p.m. on c-span. requiring congress to act intestified working around the legislative body. speaking at the briefings hosted by the christian science monitor. he said he's hopeful not confident about the perspective for a tax reform. and expressed a willing tons look at the medicare eligibility age in the context of deficit reduction. this is an hour. >> thank you for coming. welcome to our first breakfast of the new year. our guest is sander levin of michigan. this is the first visit with the group. we welcome him. he's a detroit native learned bachelor of degree in chicago. elected michigan state senate. he was assistant administrator to agency for international developm
speeches from the last 60 years starting at 8 p.m. eastern with president ronald reagan's address from 1981. though clinton in 1993, president dwight eisenhower in 1957. harry truman, 1949. 1969, richard nixon. then-president john f. kennedy in 1961. george h. w. bush in 1989. lyndon johnson from 1965. president jimmy carter in 1977. he will wrap up the night at 11 p.m. eastern president george w. bush, 2001. starting tonight at 8 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> why did you write a book about your experience because it was an abortive period of history. i felt that the fdic's perspective should be brought to bear. have been some other accounts of the crisis i thought were not completely accurate. especially since what we did and what i did. so i thought it was important for historical record to present our perspective and also i think currently for people to understand that there were different policy choices, different policy options, disagreements. and that if we want to present this crisis, another crisis from happening again i've only felt that the public itself needed to be engaged more on
see ourselves as if ronald reagan likes to see a city shining on the, let's befuddled most of all look at the place of gun violence of the second amendment? >> one of the most interesting things for me to see what the discussion is the idea that comes up over and over again about futility, efforts to regulate guns. one statistic is most people, almost everybody knows about guns in america is that we have 300 million people in 300 guns and that leaves lots of people to throw up their hands and think anything we do in the reagan victory site is futile. i'm actually not that pessimistic myself i hope this is one of the themes that comes up in the public discussion is to move forward for two reasons. one thing important to keep in mind if they are very concentrated and very sedentary. 10% of all people in the united states on about 80% of the guns. they're mostly middle-class, middle-age people in rural areas and hold onto their guns for a long time. on the other hand, most of the people engaging crying our teens and young adults in most criminal careers are short. one of things that means
and the 21st century as the champions as we see ourselves as the rule of law as ronald reagan would like to see, a city shining on the hill, what befuddles you most about as you look at this debate about guns and violence? >> i think one of the most interesting things for me to see with the discussion is the idea that comes up over and over again about futility, efforts to regulate guns. i think one statistic that almost everybody knows about guns in america as we have about 300 million people and about 300 million guns in at least lots of people to think anything we do in the regulatory side is futile. i'm actually not that pessimistic myself and this is one of the themes that comes up in the public discussions as we move forward after the president announces tomorrow for two reasons. one thing important to keep in mind is that they are a very concentrated and very set in terry. 10% of people in the united states on about 80% of the guns. they're mostly middle class middle aged people in rural areas and they hold onto their kind for a long time. on the other hand, most of the people eng
as a kind of, as ronald reagan liked to say, a city shining on the hill, what befuddles you most of all as you look at this debate about the place of guns and violence and the second amendment in america? >> i think one of the, um, one of the most interesting things for me to see with the discussion the idea that comes up over and over again about the futility of efforts to regulate guns. i think i one statistic that almost everybody e knows about guns in america is that we have about 300 million people and about 300 million guns. and that leads lots of people to just throw up their hands and think anything we do on the regulatory side is futile. i'm actually not that pessimistic myself, and i hope this is one of the themes that comes up in the public discussions as we move forward after the president announces tomorrow for two reasons. one thing that's really important to keep in mind with guns in america is that they are a very concentrated and very sedentary. so about 10% of all the people in the united states own about 80% of the guns. they're mostly middle class, middle-aged people
'neill and ronald reagan six. that's why the demographics are so important when you have health care costs rising. so it is a hard question. what the government has done is undermined personal responsibility because if i can pay a flat fee at the beginning of the year monthly to where i have no other payment on my health care and i don't have to worry about it, most of the time i'm going to do that, but what does that do to the consumption toward overconsumption of health care and your listeners will be offended at this but when we study of we know it's true and have the same disease set as one that does. what does that tell us? what that tells us is that if we know -- if we know we are not paying any more for something, then we will tend to over consume. we will be less frugal if you're telling me i can go to the mall this afternoon when we finish and buy christmas presents on your credit card will ids frugal with your credit card as i would with mine? the answer is human nature. the studies show no, you're not. what we have to do -- there is a second thing that i think is important. when we und
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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